General, knitting patterns

How to make a knitted crown (and rock your inner May Queen)

As Spring has now sprung on UK shores (and we do have a royal wedding coming up) I thought it was about time I had my own flower crown. So I spent May Day embracing my inner May Queen by knitting an appropriate head piece. My idea was to adorn it with some wild flowers (weeds to some) not realising that most people were spending their bank holiday manicuring their lawns and verges. Thankfully I was able to find a few unkempt patches to gather a few daisies and buttercups which had managed to avoid the Big Mow only to end up in my fairy photoshoot!

Knit a crown
Yes, your majesty?

This crown is easy to make and involves a small amount of a double knit yarn (mine is shown in Sirdar cotton DK). You will also need a 3.25mm circular needle (or alternative to achieve the required tension) and a couple of stitch markers. I decorated the tips of my crown spikes, of which there are seven, with a metal bead. With a tension of 22sts to 10cm, the crown has a 48cm circumference and is shown on an average sized adult female head of 55.5cm/22in.

Working the rim

Cast on 105sts on to a 3.25mm circular needle and join to work in the round, placing marker to indicate the start of the round.

Work 20 rounds of garter stitch (alternating a knit round with a purl round).

Working the spikes

Now change from working in the round to working back and forth on each spike in turn while leaving the remaining stitches on the circular needle until needed. The spikes require a double centred decrease, an s2kp, which is worked as follows: slip nxt 2 sts together knitwise, k1, pass slipped sts over. 2 sts decreased. Please note that you will need to develop a suitable marker replacement tactic as the central stitch gets absorbed into the stitch in front and the stitch behind with this decrease.

Spike 1 is worked over the next 15sts:

Row 21 (RS): K7, place marker to mark the next stitch as the centre stitch, k8. 15sts. Turn work.

Nxt row (WS): Knit to marker, slip marker, knit to end.

Nxt row (RS): Knit to one stitch before marker, s2kp (rearranging marker to indicate the new centre stitch), knit to end of spike. 13sts.

Nxt row: As previous WS row.

Repeat the last two rows, decreasing two sts centrally on each RS row until 3 sts remain.

Nxt row (WS): Sl1, k2tog, psso. 1 st.

Cut yarn and pull through to fasten.

With RS facing, rejoin yarn to rim and knit next 15 sts repeating the instructions for Spike 1 to create the next and subsequent spikes.

When all seven spikes are complete, sew in ends and decorate as desired.

I threaded through some daisies and buttercups but the crown would look equally fabulous adorned with beads, buttons or embroidery. And for those of you who make your own Christmas crackers……..

knitted crown flatlay low res
How many ways can you decorate a crown?

I’d love to see what you come up with. Please feel free to tag me @nickybarfoot on instagram or post to my facebook page.

Happy knitting!

 

General

Colour me Spring (or your camera is your design friend, be a tourist in your home town and avoiding the shops at all costs)

I am sitting at my computer looking out of the window at a glorious Spring day. The sky is blue, the grass is green and there are signs of growth everywhere. It has prompted me to write a short post about colour inspiration (but is probably really just an excuse to show you some recent photos of the amazing plant life that is currently inspiring me).  After 10 years of using a robust mobile phone where the battery life was more than a month long and I could throw it across the room (accidentally of course not because I am prone to tantrums) without fear of breakage, my lovely Mother in law upgraded her phone just after Christmas and I inherited an i phone 5. While I have yet to get to grips with a painfully short battery life (that has caught me out on a number of occasions already) I have fallen in love with the amazing camera on it.  Helped and inspired by the generous teachings of Emily and Stef at Makelight, my photography has come on leaps and bounds and now I can’t go any where without documenting the amazing visuals around me that I had previously taken for granted.

I know that some of my students on my knitting workshops have told me that they find choosing colours for a project quite scary and friends have also confided in me in the past that they don’t indulge in the relaxing past time of adult colouring books for fear of choosing the wrong schemes. Having done a City and Guilds course and various art qualifications I have explored colour in an academic way and I have got to admit that rather than being more equipped to use it, the theory put me right off. Until, that is, someone suggested that I went back to observation. Nature so often gets it right (after all, survival depends on attraction) and with the ability to take a quick pic of a pleasing colour scheme pretty much whenever one is exposed to it, what could be easier?

Southampton park 1
Southampton City Centre!

Taking more of an interest in my surroundings recently has also highlighted to me just how beautiful the parks are in central Southampton. While everyone was crowed in to West Quay shopping centre yesterday I escaped to this glorious setting a few hundred metres away, which we are so lucky to have and which the council do a great job of maintaining.  And yes, it smelled as good as it looked.  A great little trick to appreciate the familiar of home surroundings that someone suggested to me recently was to pretend that you are a tourist, seeing your city or town for the first time. What would you look at, take pictures of, write about?

pink flower low res
Close up park life

And it’s not just the parks that are blooming marvellous at the moment. Everywhere you look stuff is growing, sometimes planted with care and sometimes quite randomly.

daffs low res
Residential road sign
black bush low res
in a car park
moss on tree low res
moss and lichens on a tree
burgundy plant low res
no idea what this is but love its structure and the contrast with the background

I hope I have inspired you to go on a photo walk and given you a few suggestions to help you choose your next project colour scheme (or at least tempted you to look at the familiar with fresh eyes).  I haven’t mentioned shape and structure inspiration in this post but as you can see from the few pictures I have shared with you that nature is also an amazing source of inspiration for that too. So, enjoy the Spring folks, get inspired by colour, get snapping and until next time….