Exhibitions, Knitted Art

Room 6 at the Knit and Stitch Shows 2018

Missing Elements poster

What a privilege

I am excited to tell you that after a few years off, I shall be exhibiting again at the Knitting and Stitching Shows this year. My work will be alongside the five other talented artists who make up Room 6: Irene Belcher, Caroline Bell, Susan Chapman, Alison Hulme and Consuelo Simpson.

Missing Elements

We are a group who come together for exhibitions but work individually. We make to themes to create a cohesive show while allowing our artistic individuality to shine through. For the Knit and Stitch Shows we chose the title of “Missing Elements” and each artist has responded to this with their own body of work. Expect a varied exhibition, both interpretation of the theme as well as media and style.

 

female seated life pose
Seated life pose, a page from my sketchbook

Those of you who have followed my work for a while know that animals are my usual muses but I also have a fascination for the human body. This is driven by my other identity as a sports injury specialist and movement rehabilitator. I am also interested in the use of language and inspired by Pop Culture. It is these seemingly disparate sources of artistic interest that have come together in my body of work (no pun intended) for Missing Elements. Read on to find out how I’ve made the connection.

Whose Bird?

Bird, chick, duck and hen are all words used to describe human females. The first two are commonly prefixed by a male possessive “my”, while the latter are considered terms of endearment in certain parts of the UK. Interestingly, Bird and Chick are two of the four most hated “pet” names by women according to a well known British Tabloid.

Many suggestions are given as to why women are labelled in this way. These range from a middle English word “burde” meaning “young woman”, through to the more misogynistic explanations. These include comparisons of mental ability between our feathered friends and those of us of a homogametic persuasion (“bird brained”), and the similarities in sound emitted from a pen of fowl and a room full of young women.

Misogyny or endearment aside, while we may all share eggs as our reproductive tools, according to the Collins English dictionary a bird is a creature with feathers and wings. I would therefore suggest that the most defining characteristics are missing.

The Artwork

Bird sketches
Two sketchbook pages from my #100daysofinspiredbyart project

I started to develop the visual side of this work during this year’s 100 day project (I’ve talked about this in a previous post) back in June . These are two of the sketches that provided that aha moment.

Knitted Paintings

It’s been a couple of years since I made a knitted painting and these drawings were really begging to be knitted. So I dug out the graph paper and my colouring pencils and went about translating these pictures into hand knitted fabric.

Blue Bird knitted picture
“Blue Bird” knitted painting, WIP

The final pieces

Of the work that I have created for this series I have decided on four knitted paintings to display at the shows. I am excited to see (and hear) what people think of them. As with all of my work I hope it brings a few smiles to a few faces. I’ll leave you with a sneak peek of part of the piece I’ve called “Duck”.

Duck knitted painting lower res
“Duck” knitted “painting” by Nicky Barfoot

I’ll be stewarding at the Ally Pally show if any of you lovely folks are coming. Please do drop by and say hi. I’d love to see you.

x

 

General

5 ways to kick start your creativity this September

Making the most of the time of year

5 ways to kick start your creativity this september

I love September. It is probably my favourite month of the year. In the Northern hemisphere there is so much energy around after the lazy days of Summer. The light is beautiful, deep and golden, in contrast to the bright glare of the previous months. The air has a wonderful silky feel and ripe fruit smell to it.

I also find it my most creative time of year. This might be due to the build up to Christmas which as a maker and a teacher of crafts, is the highlight of the year for sales. It is also probably due to spending many years as a competitive athlete where Summer was race season. After a two week break, September always marked the start of a new training regime with all of its exciting promise.

So, if like me, you are itching to get those creative juices flowing this month but are not sure where to start, I thought I’d share some of the things that I use to get doing.

5 Ways to get those creative juices flowing

1. Your own 100 day project

If you are a user of Instagram you might already be aware of the growing phenomena of the 100 day project. The brainchild of Elle Luna, this happens every April where you choose and announce a creative project that you can realistically do every day for 100 days. To keep the motivation going and to introduce some form of accountability, participants are encouraged to post on Instagram daily with their output, both in the 100 day project hashtag as well as your own project specific hashtag.

2018 was my second year of participation in the official 100 day project and you can see my project here #100daysofinspiredbyart.

100 day project sketchbook
One of my 2018 100 day project sketchbooks

The official version will begin again next April but there is nothing to stop you committing to your own personal version now. 100 days was originally chosen as a time period where endurance starts to play a part. Many Instagram challenges are 14 days or a month long which is much easier to commit to but equally also much easier to forget about once completed. For 100 days there will be times where it is a chore to contribute to the project and other things will be competing with your time and motivation.

The upside of this is a daily discipline which can become a habit and something that is much harder to let slide. I created a habit of getting the sketchbook out first thing in the morning after grabbing a cup of coffee and letting the dogs out. I am still doing this now.

You will also have created a significant body of work in that time period. I have two full sketchbooks from this year’s project and many of the drawings that I did for it have led to follow on textile work with many more still to be developed.

Interestingly at time of writing we have 113 days to Christmas so another perfect reason to get going?

2. Mind Mapping a theme

In my creative work both making art and designing workshops, I am often given a theme to work to. As deadlines are also usually involved if I waited for a flash of inspiration I would probably end up in a last minute panic with an unsatisfactory piece of work or design. One of the best ways I’ve found for me to generate ideas in these circumstances is to get writing. Mind maps have a way of allowing me to participate in and record these mind dumps. You may remember the process from school or college.

mind map
Mind Mapping a theme

As part of my exhibiting group, Room 6, I will be at the Knit and Stitch Shows this Autumn with an exhibition called “Missing Elements” (more about this in later posts). The picture above shows how I started the process of creating a body of work for this theme. This is only one of many maps and is the start of the process. These are just initial ideas and word associations that came to mind during this 15 minute process. From this, a couple of the ideas would begin to peak my interest and require their own map for further development. Of course if you have a big enough desk you could create it all in one place using a huge piece of paper.

3. Join a class

If you want to learn something new a class or workshop is the perfect place to do it. If you find making time for your creative pursuits difficult as more “important” things always seem to override it, scheduling time in the diary at a venue away from your everyday distractions, for a paid fee, can be a great method of commitment. Hopefully once you get started and remember how valuable it is to you, you can begin to prioritise outside of a class.

classroom pic
Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

Now that the school and college terms are starting up again, there are plenty of workshops and classes on offer for adults (I’ve got a full workshop teaching programme myself between now and Christmas). Keep an eye out on social media too as many teachers and venues list their upcoming classes on their Facebook and Instagram pages.

There are also plenty of on line classes that you can sign up to.  Craftsy offers a wide range of classes at different price points, as does Creativebug. I’ve tried classes from both and enjoyed them. On line classes often seem an ideal option as they can be cheaper and they sell you the idea that you can do them at your own pace and schedule. However this might not be a good thing if you are struggling to prioritise the time for your creativity. I have plenty of classes queued up in my on line apps that I haven’t “had the time for” yet.

4. Buy or borrow a book

creative books
Just a tiny selection from my bookshelves

There are lots of fun books out there which encourage you to do something creative on a regular basis. They may be drawing related, writing related, or more general. Some of them are about inspirational starting points and some give you more detailed instruction on how and what to make/do. What they usually have in common is a prompt of things to do which takes away the procrastination of, e.g. what shall I draw today?

If, like me, you love books, enjoy a few hours in your local book store or library and see which of these types of books might suit you. I usually buy a book when I visit Tate Modern or Britain and read it on the train journey home. By the time I pull up at the station I can’t wait to get my sketchbook out.

5. Get together with friends and make it a social event

The last idea I have for you today is to make your creativity a social event. I have recently recruited a group of my friends in a “creative club” focused on a not so secret Santa idea. We have monthly meetings scheduled to get together over coffee and cake and have some fun drawing, snipping, sticking, writing and baking. I’ll let you know how we get on…….

Please share any tips you have on getting creative in the comments. I’d love to hear.

 

Picasso Exhibition at Tate Modern, a Visitor's review
Exhibitions

Picasso at Tate Modern, a visitor’s review

 

Last weekend I snuck off on an early train to London to indulge in some quality art appreciation at Tate Modern. My destination was the much talked about Picasso exhibition.

The focus is 1932 a make-or-break year for the artist who had turned 50 the year before (mmm, ringing a few bells for me then). There was no doubt about his reputation and fame but critics were beginning to talk about him as an artist of the past rather than the future. This exhibition shows his reluctance to be sidelined in favour of the younger talent coming through and marked an energetic and creative period of his life and perhaps some of his most accomplished works.

Picasso exhibition shopping
Some of my souvenirs from the exhibition

“The work that one does is a way of keeping a diary”, Pablo Picasso.

I was fascinated and encouraged by his disdain for chronology. Apparently his self curated exhibitions comprised of work from all periods mixed together. His sketchbooks were renowned for having work from various years in them, almost like he picked up the nearest sketchbook to hand and used it (ha ha, just like me then. I love it when I can liken what I thought were my unorganised practices to those of the most celebrated artist of the past century!). He didn’t seem to discard early work as being less worthy than the latest projects and I’ve taken that on board (I’m guessing I’m not the only one who moves on and doesn’t look back? Previous work is still relevant and perhaps becomes more so in light of what follows).

So what to expect from this big exhibition (apart from marvelling at the productivity of this man)?

  • Wonderful curves and bright, contrasting colour defining planes.
  • Breasts in strange places.
  • Flip top heads.
  • Furniture (not usually abstracted and often referenced in the title e.g. Woman in a Red Armchair).
  • Fabulous bulbous head sculptures.

“You start a painting and it becomes something altogether different. It’s strange how little the artist’s will matters”. Pablo Picasso.

Sketch of a Boisgeloup sculpture
Sketch of one of the sculptures, front view

The most exciting part of this exhibition for me I think was seeing the Boisgeloup sculptures. I spent a bit of time sketching these wonderful, voluminous heads and marvelling at how the curves flowed in to one another (you only really get an appreciation for that sort of thing when you try and draw it).

 

Sketch of a Boisgeloup sculpture
A side view of one of the sculptures. I think some aliens in recent Sci Fi movies/programmes may have been inspired by these? 

Thoroughly excited by the work of this genius, of course I couldn’t wait to play when I got home. I am a huge fan of art books directed at children as I find them much more playful and imaginative than the drier adult versions. Quite a while back I remember an exercise from one of the books in my collection about recreating your own Picasso inspired drawing. Here is the recipe:

  1. Draw an eye anywhere on the page.
  2. Turn the page 90 degrees clockwise and draw another, much bigger eye, anywhere on the page.
  3. Turn by 90 degrees clockwise and draw a nose, anywhere.
  4. Turn by 90 degrees and draw a mouth.
  5. Turn by 90 degrees and draw a limb/hand/paw etc.

You get the idea? Once you have a few features on the page, you use a couple of lines to join them up. Do a bit of colouring in and decide which way up you fancy hanging your work of art.

Picasso dog
My Picasso inspired Dog 

This is so much fun I urge you to have a go. Animals, people anything really. Mix it up and enjoy.

I hope I’ve given you a taste of this wonderful exhibition and if you are able to get to London I strongly recommend a visit. I’ll leave you with another quote from this amazing artist:

“Essentially there is only love, whatever it may be”. Pablo Picasso.

Exhibitions, General

Christmas Craft Fair in Winchester, Saturday 9 December 2017

I’ve been a busy bee over the past month making Weim and kitty inspired artwork to share with you wonderful folks at the Winchester Discovery Centre Christmas Craft Fair next Saturday 9 December. I love the build up to Christmas and while Mr B is secretly watching the Christmas 24 channel all the way through November, I hold back until 1 December and then let loose with gusto on fairy lights, snuggly knitwear and photos of Weimadogs in antlers. I can not lie, I get a little excited.

The only in person sales event (my Etsy shop is open as usual) I am doing this Christmas is an art and craft fair at the Winchester Discovery Centre on Saturday 9 December. It’s free entry so I hope that lots of you can pop in and say hi while you combine it with a visit to the Alice Kettle exhibition (see previous post) which is in the same building, and of course a wander around the Winchester Cathedral Christmas Market.

I’ll be there with my textile sculptures, brooches (new!) and cards, all perfect for one of a kind, hand made, Christmas gifting purposes. Of course there will be lots of other talented makers there too. I hope some of you local lovelies can make it.

Winchester Discovery Centre
A perfect opportunity to pick up one of a kind gifts

 

Exhibitions, General

Ally Pally Knit and Stitch Show 2017, Roundup (and three awesome Textile Artists to look out for)

An October highlight for UK textile enthusiasts is the Knitting and Stitching show at Alexandra Palace in London. Not only do we get to fill our boots with yarny goodness, it is also an opportunity to catch up with fellow enthusiasts from the Textile World, find out who is new and inspiring, and some of us get to spend a day with our wonderful Mums!

I was particularly excited this year as a friend of mine, the super talented and rather lovely Sarah Waters, had a solo exhibition in the textile gallery. I couldn’t wait to see what she had done with it and as expected it was amazing.

Sarah Waters Stones pairing
Sarah Waters from her exhibition: Stone

Sarah is an experienced felt artist based in the UK’s New Forest. Her work is inspired by our connection to nature and she has a particular interest in sustainability. Her exhibition at the Knit and Stitch shows this year consists of large scale wall hangings, rich with texture and full of beautiful natural colours, depicting stone, the natural inspiration behind it. Felt sculptures add a three dimensional element to the exhibition. Sarah’s exhibition will be at the sister shows in Dublin and Harrogate so if you are lucky enough to be going to these I highly recommend you pay her a visit. More information about Sarah and her work can be found on her website here.

Sarah Waters Stones beige hanging
Sarah Waters

Another gallery which stopped me in my tracks for a better look was Ann Small’s Layered Cloth exhibition. She has recently published a book of the same name and the work she had on display tempted me to add it to my Christmas List. Beautiful ruffles, folds, puffs, slashes, you name it, anything you can do to create a three dimensional effect from stitching and fabric was here.

Ann Small Blue sea urchin
Ann Small “Blue Sea Urchin”

Her work made me smile, it had a sense of fun to it as well as a technical wow factor hence I wasn’t surprised when I read that she has a background in theatre and fancy dress costume making.

Ann Small White shell
Ann Small’s “White Shell”

More about Ann and her work can be found here.

The final artist I’d like to introduce you to in this post is possibly my new favourite textile artist having not come across her work before. Rachael Howard’s gallery “Red Work” consisted of large scale grids of colourful, simplistic illustrations depicting everyday family life. Her inspiration for the exhibition was taken from 19th century red work story quilts and she likens the effect of these historical textiles to modern day Instagram.

Rachel Howard Red Work wall quilt
Rachael Howard

Her work is rich in humour, is very accessible and evokes a personal narrative from the viewer. If you get a chance to check out Rachael’s art she has a website here.

Rachel Howard Red Work dog in suit
Rachael Howard

In this post I’ve mentioned three of my favourite galleries from this year’s Ally Pally. There was so much to see I always wish I can have another day to fully appreciate everything but unfortunately dog dinners awaited and we had to dash off. We didn’t leave without a bit of shopping though (my Mum is such a bad influence on me!).

Kniting and Stitching Show, Ally Pally, 2017
Some of the goodies I had to hide from Mr B when I got home

Please feel free to leave a comment on this post if would like to share a highlight from this year’s show and if you are visiting the Dublin or Harrogate Knitting and Stitching Shows I hope you have a wonderful time.

Until next time……